Sammlung von Newsfeeds

Readers' Showcase: Documentary and Street photography

Digital Photography Review - So, 19/10/2014 - 11:37

With all the talk about new equipment at this time of year it's worth remembering why we buy that gear - to make great photos. What better way to do it than to showcase the excellent work of our own community? This week we asked users of our Documentary And Street photography forum to submit their favorite shots for inclusion in our Readers' Showcase. Click through to take a look at our favorites

Kategorien: Fotografie

Ghost Town: Shooting in Kolmanskop

Digital Photography Review - So, 19/10/2014 - 10:00

Nature photographer Erez Marom captures a wide range of subjects, from macro shots of insects to some of the world's most dramatic landscapes. In this article, he shares images from a very unusual location - the ghost town of Kolmanskop, in Namibia. Abandoned over fifty years ago, Kolmanskop was a diamond-mining town, and is currently being reclaimed by the desert. Click through to take a look at Erez Marom's images and learn about his process

Kategorien: Fotografie

Fotodiox creates 'Tough E-Mount' for Sony E & FE-mount cameras

Digital Photography Review - Sa, 18/10/2014 - 10:00

Sony's NEX and Alpha range of E and FE-mount cameras have a lot going for them, but some users have reported a 'wiggle' in the lensmount, especially when heavier lenses, or third-party optics via adapters are used. Fotodiox thinks it has the answer with its new 'Tough E-Mount' - literally a replacement lensmount for E and FE-mount cameras. With a single metal ring replacing the two (one metal, one plastic) originally attached to the camera, the Tough E-Mount should (according to the manufacturer) eliminate any movement between camera and lens. Click through for more details

Kategorien: Fotografie

Lee Filters introduces Landscape Polariser with built-in warm-up

Digital Photography Review - Sa, 18/10/2014 - 08:01

British filter manufacturer Lee Filters has announced a new polarising filter that features a built-in warm-up effect that it says is aimed at landscape photographers. The 105mm Landscape Polariser has been designed with a shallow mount and with a 105mm diameter so that it will be useful for wide angle views, with the company suggesting it will be compatible with focal lengths as wide as 16mm on full frame SLRs. Read more

Kategorien: Fotografie

Ricoh’s award-winning K-50 DSLR kit is now even more attractive, adds Wi-Fi for under $500

Imaging Resource - Fr, 17/10/2014 - 22:35
    Last December, Ricoh's impressive Pentax K-50 digital SLR took top place in our annual Camera of the Year awards as 2013's Best Entry-Level DSLR. Based around the same sensor as the company's then-flagship Pentax K-5 II DSLR, the key to the K-50's success was a design that brought numerous enthusiast-grade features down to a consumer-friendly pricetag. At the time, the weather-sealed Pentax K-50 was priced at US$780 for a kit that included an 18-55mm zoom lens which was also weather-sealed. That was simply unheard-of...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

Firmware Friday: Nikon solves battery-charging issues for Coolpix P340, P600

Imaging Resource - Fr, 17/10/2014 - 19:46
    If you've been having difficulty getting the battery of your Nikon Coolpix P600 or P340 digital camera to take a charge, we have good news this Firmware Friday. Nikon is aware of the problem, and it's just released new firmware aimed at resolving the issue. Nikon P600 firmware version 1.2 and Nikon P340 firmware version 1.2 both correct a problem that could result in the battery failing to take a charge once fully discharged, so if you have any battery packs that weren't charging, now is the time to try them once more --...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

Delkin introduces new 'Black' range of rugged SD cards

Digital Photography Review - Fr, 17/10/2014 - 18:41

Delkin has introduced a new trio of rugged SD cards suitable for photographers who shoot in harsh environments, reducing the odds of losing photographs because of card damage. Delkin's new 'Black' SD cards are designed to handle extreme temperatures, as well as exposure to dust, water, and crushing forces. Read more

Kategorien: Fotografie

This week's sponsor: Vitamin T

A List Apart - Fr, 17/10/2014 - 14:55

Vitamin T connects amazing digital creative talent with equally awesome mid-sized companies and ad agencies. Freelancers rejoice!

Kategorien: Webdesign

Accessory Review: LaCie Rugged Thunderbolt

Digital Photography Review - Fr, 17/10/2014 - 10:20

Earlier this year, storage manufacturer LaCie launched an upgraded version of its Rugged hard drive that features improved damage resistance and a built-in Thunderbolt cable. The new Rugged Thunderbolt drive is available with either a hard disk or an SSD, and also has a USB 3.0 port for universal connectivity. Is it a good storage option for photographers who need something that can handle the bumps in the road? Read more

Kategorien: Fotografie

Canon introduces new $78K 50-1000mm cine lens

Digital Photography Review - Fr, 17/10/2014 - 01:01

Canon has taken the wraps off its new 50-1000mm CN20x 50 IAS H E1/P1 cinema lens, expanding its cine-servo offerings with what the maker says is the first-ever lens boasting a combined 20x magnification, integrated 1.5x extender, and a removable servo drive. The lens is targeted specifically at nature and sports television productions, as evidenced by its far from enthusiast-friendly $78K price-tag. Click through for more details

Kategorien: Fotografie

Apple unveils iPad Air 2, iPad Mini 3 and new 27in iMac with '5K' display

Digital Photography Review - Do, 16/10/2014 - 22:07

After unveiling its new iPhone models last month, Apple announced two new tablets today - the iPad Air 2 and the iPad mini 3. The iPad Air 2 features a new Apple A8X chipset which Apple claims is 40% faster at the CPU level than the processor used in its predecessor. The iPad Air 2's cameras have been upgraded too, and both new tablets also gains the TouchID fingerprint sensor. Meanwhile Apple also announced a new version of its 27in iMac desktop computer with a 5120 x 2880 screen resolution. Click through to read more

Kategorien: Fotografie

Google announces Nexus 9 8.9-inch tablet

Digital Photography Review - Do, 16/10/2014 - 21:54

Alongside the new Motorola-made Nexus 6 smartphone Google has also launched a new Nexus tablet, the 8.9-inch Nexus 9. The Nexus 9 is the first HTC-made Nexus device since the original Nexus One in 2010. Despite the different manufacturers the Nexus 9 specifications are equally high-end as those of its smartphone cousin. The new tablet comes with an 8.9-inch IPS LCD display that offers a 2,048 x 1,440 resolution and top-of-the-line interior components. Click through to read more

Kategorien: Fotografie

Adobe releases new 'Aperture Importer' plugin for Lightroom

Digital Photography Review - Do, 16/10/2014 - 20:45

Following Apple's decision to cease development of Aperture, Adobe has released a plugin for Lightroom that enables erstwhile Aperture users to easily port their old libraries into Adobe's ecosystem once and for all. 'Aperture Importer' is a Lightroom add-on that allows users of Aperture and iPhoto to import their libraries into Lightroom complete with associated data ranging from flagging, GPS information and keywords to star ratings. Click through for a link

Kategorien: Fotografie

Olympus 40-150mm f/2.8 Pro Lens Review: The best current telephoto zoom for the MFT world

Imaging Resource - Do, 16/10/2014 - 17:15
    To follow up on our hands-on look at the new Olympus 40-150 f/2.8 M.Zuiko Pro telephoto zoom lens, our full, in-depth review is now complete, including test results, sample test-chart images and our final conclusion! Officially announced this year just prior to Photokina in September, this telephoto zoom lens is the latest move in Olympus's drive to sway professional photographers away from their big, bulky DSLRs and into the more compact yet still high-performance OM-D family. Boasting a versatile 80-300mm-equivalent focal...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

Production-ready: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH4 Review

Digital Photography Review - Do, 16/10/2014 - 15:00

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH4 puts together a solid stills shooting feature set, including a 16MP Four Thirds sensor, 2.36m dot viewfinder, fully articulating 3-inch LCD and 12 fps continuous shooting. But its headline specs are in the video category - Cinema 4K recording and a host of tools for video shooters like focus peaking and zebra settings. We put its capabilities in stills and video to the test. Read review

Kategorien: Fotografie

Nishant Kothary on the Human Web: The Politics of Feedback

A List Apart - Do, 16/10/2014 - 13:30

“Were you going for ‘not classy’? Because if you were, that’s cool. This isn’t classy like some of your other work,” said my wife, glancing at a long day’s work on my screen.

“Yep. That’s what I was going for!” I responded with forced cheer. I knew she was right, though, and that I’d be back to the drawing board the next morning.

This is a fairly typical exchange between us. We quit our jobs last year to bootstrap an app (for lack of a better word) that we’re designing and building ourselves. I’m the front-end guy, she’s the back-end girl. And currently, she’s the only user who gives me design feedback. Not because it’s hard to find people to give you feedback these days; we all know that’s hardly the case. She’s the only one providing feedback because I think that’s actually the right approach here.

I realize this flies in the face of conventional wisdom today, though. From VC’s and startup founders emphatically endorsing the idea that a successful entrepreneur is characterized by her willingness—scratch that: her obsession with seeking out feedback from anyone willing to give it, to a corporate culture around “constructive” feedback so pervasive that the seven perpendicular lines-drawing Expert can have us laughing and crying with recognition, we’ve come to begrudgingly accept that when it comes to feedback—the more, the merrier.

This conventional wisdom flies in the face of some opposing conventional wisdom, though, that’s best captured by the adage, “Too many cooks spoil the broth.” Or if you’d prefer a far more contemporary reference, look no further than Steve Jobs when he talked to Business Week about the iMac back in ’98: “For something this complicated, it’s really hard to design products by focus groups. A lot of times, people don’t know what they (customers) want until you show it to them.”

So which is it? Should we run out and get as much feedback as possible? Or should we create in a vacuum? As with most matters of conventional wisdom, the answer is: Yes.

In theory, neither camp is wrong. The ability to place your ego aside and calmly listen to someone tell you why the color scheme of your design or the architecture of your app is wrong is not just admirable and imitable, but extremely logical. Quite often, it’s exactly these interactions that help preempt disasters. On the flip side, there is too much self-evident wisdom in the notion that, borrowing words from Michael Harris, “Our ideas wilt when exposed to scrutiny too early.” Indeed, some of the most significant breakthroughs in the world can be traced back to the stubbornness of an individual who saw her vision through in solitude, and usually in opposition to contemporary opinion.

In practice, however, we can trace most of our failures to a blind affiliation to one of the two camps. In the real world, the more-the-merrier camp typically leaves us stumbling through a self-inflicted field of feedback landmines until we step on one that takes with it our sense of direction and, often more dramatically, our faith in humanity. The camp of shunners, on the other hand, leads us to fortify our worst decisions with flimsy rationales that inevitably cave in on us like a wall of desolate Zunes.

Over the years I’ve learned that we’re exceptionally poor at determining whether the task at hand calls for truly seeking feedback about our vision, or simply calls for managing the, pardon my French, politics of feedback: ensuring that stakeholders feel involved and represented fairly in the process. Ninety-nine out of a hundred times, it is the latter, but we approach it as the former. And, quite expectedly, ninety-nine out of a hundred times the consequences are catastrophic.

At the root of this miscalculation is our repugnance at the idea of politics. Our perception of politics in the office—that thing our oh-so-despicable middle managers mask using words like “trade-off,” “diplomacy,” “partnership,” “process,” “metrics,” “review” and our favorite, “collaboration”—tracks pretty closely to our perception of governmental politics: it’s a charade that people with no real skills use to oppress us. What we conveniently forget is that politics probably leads to the inclusion of our own voice in the first place.

We deceive ourselves into believing that our voice is the most important one. That the world would be better served if the voices of those incompetent, non-technical stakeholders were muted or at the very least, ignored. And while this is a perfectly fine conclusion in some cases, it’s far from true for a majority of them. But this fact usually escapes most of us, and we frequently find ourselves clumsily waging a tense war on our clients and stakeholders: a war that is for the greater good, and thus, a necessary evil, we argue. And the irony of finding ourselves hastily forgoing a politically-savvy, diplomatic design process in favor of more aggressive (or worse, passive-aggressive) tactics is lost on us thanks to our proficiency with what Ariely dubs the fudge factor in his book The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty: “How can we secure the benefits of cheating and at the same time still view ourselves as honest, wonderful people? As long as we cheat by only a little bit, we can benefit from cheating and still view ourselves as marvelous human beings. This balancing act is the process of rationalization, and it is the basis of what we’ll call the fudge factor theory.”

Whether we like it or not, we’re all alike: we’re deeply political and our level of self-deception about our own political natures is really the only distinguishing factor between us.

And the worst part is that politics isn’t even a bad thing.

On the contrary, when you embrace it and do it right, politics is a win-win, with you delivering your best work, and your clients, stakeholders, and colleagues feeling a deep sense of accomplishment and satisfaction as well. It’s hard to find examples of these situations, and even harder to drive oneself to search for them over the noise of the two camps, but there are plenty out there if you keep your eyes open. One of my favorites, particularly because the scenarios are in the form of video and have to do with design and development, comes in the form of the hit HGTV show Property Brothers. Starring 6'4" identical twins Drew (the “business guy” realtor) and Jonathan (the “designer/developer” builder), every episode is a goldmine for learning the right way to make clients, stakeholders, and colleagues (first-time home owners) a part of the feedback loop for a project (remodeling a fixer-upper) without compromising on your value system.

Now, on the off-chance you are actually looking for someone to validate your vision—say you’re building a new product for a market that doesn’t exist or is already saturated, or if someone specifically hired you to run with a radical new concept of your own genius (hey, it can happen)—it’ll be a little trickier. You will need feedback, and it’ll have to be from someone who is attuned to the kind of abstract thinking that would let them imagine and navigate the alternate universe that is so vivid in your mind. If you are able to find such a person, paint them the best picture you can with whatever tools are at your disposal, leave your ego at the door, and pay close attention to what they say.

But bear in mind that if they are unable see your alternate universe, it’s hardly evidence that it’s just a pipe dream with no place in the real world. After all, at first not just the most abstract thinkers, but even the rest of us couldn’t imagine an alternate universe with the internet. Or the iPhone. Or Twitter. The list is endless.

For now, I’m exhilarated that there’s at least one person who sees mine. And I’d be a fool to ignore her feedback.

Kategorien: Webdesign

Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II: A travel photographer's perspective

Digital Photography Review - Do, 16/10/2014 - 10:00

Like any travel photographer, David Julian is happy to carry less gear whenever possible on his trips. With a photo expedition to Alaska on the horizon, he agreed to take the Canon G1 X Mark II for a spin and try it out from a travel photographer's perspective. No doubt it's easy to carry on a long journey, but is it versatile enough to be a traveler's primary camera? Read more

Kategorien: Fotografie

Google launches Nexus 6 with 13MP and OIS

Digital Photography Review - Do, 16/10/2014 - 01:01

Google has launched the Nexus 6, its latest showcase phone that comes with a brand new version of Android, 5.0 'Lollipop', and an interesting-looking camera specification. The device comes with the same dual-LED ring flash as the Moto X and a 13MP imaging sensor. However, it adds a slightly faster F2.0 aperture and an optical image stabilization system into the mix. Read more 

Kategorien: Fotografie

Raw conversions added to Canon EOS 7D Mark II: Real-world samples (beta)

Digital Photography Review - Mi, 15/10/2014 - 22:39

The Canon EOS 7D Mark II is the long-awaited replacement to the 7D, which was launched in 2009. It features a 20.2MP APS-C CMOS sensor and dual DIGIC 6 image processors. It has a new 65-point, all cross-type autofocus system as well as an updated version of Canon's Dual Pixel CMOS AF system. We've just been provided with an early build of ACR 8.7 and we've taken the opportunity to add seven Raw conversions to our previously-published gallery of real-world samples. Click through to take a look

Kategorien: Fotografie

Quick Review: Using Iconosquare to manage and grow your Instagram following

Digital Photography Review - Mi, 15/10/2014 - 14:00

Instagram's straightforward user interface is geared for posting and viewing photos, but if you've got an eye on growing or managing a large following, you'll soon run into the app's limitations. Iconosquare aims to give Instagram users basic metrics about their content and help manage large groups of followers. We tried the service out to see how it works and how useful it is. Read more

Kategorien: Fotografie