Sammlung von Newsfeeds

Canon EOS 7D Mark II studio samples added to first impressions

Digital Photography Review - Do, 23/10/2014 - 23:48

The Canon EOS 7D II is the long-awaited follow up to the 7D, offering a 20.2MP APS-C sensor, dual-pixel AF with a 65-point phase detect system and continuous shooting at 10 fps. It's also equipped with 1080/60p HD video capture and a number of compression options, as well as microphone and headphone ports. We put the 7D II through its paces in our studio and have updated our first impressions review with the results. Read more

Kategorien: Fotografie

Tamron celebrates long-zoom lens milestone

Imaging Resource - Do, 23/10/2014 - 23:14
    Third-party lens maker Tamron is celebrating this month, after total shipments of its high-power zoom lenses passed an important milestone. Some 22 years after it shipped its first long-zoom model -- the AF28-200mm F/3.8-5.6 Aspherical (Model 71D) -- all the way back in 1992, the company says sales of high-power zooms have passed a total of five million units worldwide. That might not sound like a huge number, but it's worth noting that unlike Nikon's recent announcement that it had sold 85 million Nikkor lenses, or Canon's...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

Canon patents lens designs with variable and glass elements

Digital Photography Review - Do, 23/10/2014 - 22:23

It's not uncommon for a company to patent technologies that might be incorporated into products at some point, though the company might not have any plans to use it in the immediate future. Such a business move appears to be the case with a recent Canon patent, which details the use of variable lens elements in combination with traditional glass elements. Read more

Kategorien: Fotografie

Canon Cinema EOS C100 Mark II arrives with Dual Pixel CMOS AF, Wi-Fi, faster processor

Imaging Resource - Do, 23/10/2014 - 21:12
    Movie shooters, take note: Canon has just overhauled its entry-level interchangeable-lens digital video camera, the EOS C100. The new Canon Cinema EOS C100 Mark II brings with it quite a few useful upgrades, while the original C100 gets an instant rebate that makes it more affordable than before. Of course, "more affordable" and "entry-level" are relative terms here -- the market for dedicated ILC movie cameras is relatively small and made up predominantly by pros, so prices are significantly higher than for typical SLR or...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

Rian van der Merwe on A View from a Different Valley: How to Do What You Love, the Right Way

A List Apart - Do, 23/10/2014 - 12:08

Every time I start a new job I take my dad to see my office. He loves seeing where I work, and I love showing him. It’s a thing. As much as I enjoy this unspoken ritual of ours, there’s always a predictable response from my dad that serves as a clear indicator of our large generation gap. At some point he’ll ask a question along the lines of, “So… no one has an office? You just sit out here in the open?” I’ve tried many times to explain the idea of colocation and collaborative work, but I don’t think it’s something that will ever compute for him.

This isn’t a criticism on how he’s used to doing things (especially if he’s reading this… Hi Dad!). But it shows how our generation’s career goals have changed from “I want the corner office!” to “I just want a space where I’m able to do good work.” We’ve mostly gotten over our obsession with the size and location of our physical workspaces. But we haven’t completely managed to let go of that corner office in our minds: the job title.

Even that’s starting to change, though. This tweet from Jack Dorsey has received over 1,700 retweets so far:

Titles, like "CEO", get in the way of doing the right thing. Respect to the people who ignore titles, and fight like hell for what is right.

— Jack (@jack) September 29, 2012

In episode 60 of Back to Work, Merlin Mann and Dan Benjamin discuss what they call “work as platform.” The basic idea is that we need to stop looking at work as a thing you do for a company. If you view your career like that, your success will always be linked to the success of the company, as well as your ability to survive within that particular culture. You will be at the mercy of people who are concerned about their own careers, not yours.

Instead, if you think about your work as platform, your attention starts to shift to using whatever job you are doing to develop your skills further, so that you’re never at the mercy of one company. Here’s Merlin, from about 31 minutes into that episode of Back to Work (edited down slightly):

If you think just in terms of jobs, you become a little bit short-sighted, because you tend to think in terms of, “What’s my next job?”, or “If I want good jobs in my career, what do I put on my resume?” So in terms of what you can do to make the kinds of things you want, and have the kind of career you like, I think it’s very interesting to think about what you do in terms of having a platform for what you do.

There’s always this thing about “doing what you love.” Well, doing what you love might not ever make you a nickel. And if doing what you love sucks, no one is ever going to see it, like it, and buy it, which is problematic. That’s not a branding problem, that’s a “you suck” problem. So the platform part is thinking about what you do not simply in terms of what your next job is — it’s a way of thinking about how all of the things that you do can and should and do feed into each other.

I think it’s worth giving yourself permission to take a dip into the douche-pool, and think a little bit about what platform thinking might mean to you. Because if you are just thinking about how unhappy you are with your job your horizons are going to become pretty short, and your options are going to be very limited.

So here’s how I want to pull this all together. Just like we’ve moved on from the idea that the big office is a big deal, we have to let go of the idea that a big enough title is equal to a successful career. Much more important is that we figure out what it is that we want to spend our time and attention on — and then work at our craft to make that our platform. Take a realistic look at how much agency you have at work — it may be more than you realize — and try to get the responsibilities that interest you most, just to see where it takes you.

This is also why side projects are so important. They help you use the areas you’re truly interested in to hone your skills by making something real, just for you, because you want to. And as you get really good, you’ll be able to use those skills more in your current role, which will almost certainly make for a more enjoyable job. But it could even turn into a new role at your company — or who knows, maybe even your own startup.

If you go down this path, little by little you’ll discover that you suddenly start loving what you do more and more. Doing what you love doesn’t necessarily mean quitting your job and starting a coffee shop. Most often, it means building your own platform, and crafting your own work, one step at a time.

Kategorien: Webdesign

More candy, less moolah: Pentax K-S1 gets a sweeter price and bundled Wi-Fi card

Imaging Resource - Do, 23/10/2014 - 02:49
    Eight weeks ago, Ricoh launched its Pentax K-S1 DSLR, an unusual camera whose styling divides opinions like few others. Today, the company has announced three new color variants of that camera which also add to the product bundle -- Lime Pie (lime green trim), Strawberry Cake (deep pink trim) and Blue Cream Soda (light blue trim). Dubbed the Sweets Collection, each of the three variants pairs its trim color with white body panels, for a very eyecatching look. In the process, Ricoh has also shaved US$100 off list pricing for...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

Panono announces pricing and availability for rolling ball camera

Digital Photography Review - Do, 23/10/2014 - 01:20

German startup Panono has announced availability and pricing for its ball-shaped Panono Camera. The device shoots spherical panorama images and will cost $549/€549 when it ships worldwide in the spring of 2015. The first to receive the camera will be the backers of the crowd-funding project the company used to get started before the camera goes on general release. Learn more

Kategorien: Fotografie

Canon announces EOS C100 Mark II

Digital Photography Review - Do, 23/10/2014 - 00:42

Canon has announced the upcoming release of its second-generation EOS C100 Mark II digital video camera. The device houses a Super 35mm 8.3 megapixel CMOS sensor, and is positioned as an affordable solution for film and video production, providing a variety of new design and performance upgrades. Read more

Kategorien: Fotografie

Pentax launches K-S1 Sweets Collection

Digital Photography Review - Mi, 22/10/2014 - 23:01

Ricoh Imaging is set to introduce three new colors for the company’s Pentax K-S1 DSLR camera in what it calls the 'Sweets Collection'. Already available in 12 different main body colors, the 20-million-pixel APS-C camera will now also come with a white body featuring cyan, yellow or magenta colored panels. The company has named these Strawberry Cake, Blue Cream Soda and Lime Pie, and each features the trademark colored light strip on the handgrip of the original K-S1 that was launched back in August.

Kategorien: Fotografie

Canon EOS 7D Mark II: A professional's opinion

Digital Photography Review - Mi, 22/10/2014 - 17:30

With the increasing affordability of digital full frame cameras, there's been speculation about the future of APS-C as an enthusiast format. But with the launch of the 7D Mark II, Canon has made it pretty clear it believes there's still a high-end market for crop-sensor formats. We spoke to Bettina Hansen, a photographer who regularly shoots Canon and has experience working with the original EOS 7D to see what she made of the new camera

Kategorien: Fotografie

Canon 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Review: A fresh update to their kit tele-zoom adds faster, quieter focusing

Imaging Resource - Mi, 22/10/2014 - 16:37
    Canon APS-C shooters in need of a lightweight, budget-friendly telephoto zoom should take note of Canon's refreshed EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM lens. We've just published our full review of this updated lens, and for a "kit" lens, this one's surprisingly impressive.  Released at the end of 2013, this marks the third iteration of Canon's EF-S 55-250 lens. However, it's not a replacement for the 55-250mm EF-S IS II, as both are still available for sale. Notable improvements include incorporating the new STM stepping motor...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

Learning to Be Flexible

A List Apart - Mi, 22/10/2014 - 13:30

As a freelancer, I work in a lot of different code repos. Almost every team I work with has different ideas of how code should be organized, maintained, and structured.

Now, I’m not here to start a battle about tabs versus spaces or alphabetical order of CSS properties versus organizing in terms of concerns (positioning styles, then element layout styles, then whatever else), because I’m honestly not attached to any one system anymore. I used to be a one-tab kind of person, along with not really even thinking about the ordering of my properties, but slowly, over time, I’ve realized that most of that doesn’t really matter. In all the projects I’ve worked on, the code got written and the product or site worked for the users—which is really the most important thing. What gets me excited about projects now is the code, making something work, seeing it work across different devices, seeing people use something I built, not getting upset about how it’s written.

Since I went down the freelance route again earlier this year, I’m working with many different teams and they all have different standards for how their code should be written. What I really want to know when I start a project is what the standards are, so I can adhere to them. For many teams that means a quick look through their documentation (when they have it, it’s a dream come true—there are no questions and I can just get to work). For other teams, it means I ask a lot of questions after I’ve taken a look at the code to verify how they prefer to do things.

Even more so than just thinking about how to write code, there’s the fact that I may be working in straight CSS, Sass, Stylus, Handlebars, plain old HTML, or Jade and I usually roll right along with that as well. Every team makes decisions that suit them and their way of working—I’m there to make life easier by coming in and helping them get a job done, not tell them their whole setup is wrong. The variety keeps me on my toes, but it also helps me remember that there isn’t just one way to do any of this.

What has this really done for me? I’ve started letting go of some things. I have opinions on how to structure and write CSS, but whether it’s written with a pre-processor or not, I don’t always care, and which pre-processor matters less to me as well. Any way you do it, you can get the job done. Choosing what works best for your team is what’s most important, not what anyone outside the team says is the “right” or “only” way to do something.

Kategorien: Webdesign

Preis-Roulette bei Adobe

dasauge.de - Mi, 22/10/2014 - 10:50
Adobe Creative Cloud (Key-Visual)

Adobe bietet Creative-Cloud-Abos derzeit zu willkürlich variierten Preisen an. Der Test beschert dem Nutzer eine Preisspanne von 140 Euro im Jahr.

Offenbar testet Adobe derzeit verschiedene Monatspreise für Programm-Abonnements der „Creative Cloud“. Es lohnt sich daher für Interessenten, die Einstiegsseite mit verschiedenen Browsern aufzurufen und nur dann zuzuschlagen, wenn der Preis für ein Komplett-Abo bei höchstens 49,99 Euro liegt. 10 Euro Preisspanne Die Systematik der ausgespielten Preise bleibt zunächst unklar: sie scheint nicht mit Cookies oder IP-Adresse zusammenzuhängen, reproduzierbar abweichende Preise erreichten wir nur mit…

weiterlesen…

Kategorien: Fotografie

Nikon updates Capture NX-D, ViewNX 2

Imaging Resource - Di, 21/10/2014 - 20:54
    If you're shooting with a Nikon camera, it might be time to update your bundled software. The company has just released updates to its consumer ViewNX 2 and enthusiast-oriented Capture NX-D imaging apps. The update to Capture NX-D fixes a raft of bugs, while the ViewNX 2 update adds support for one camera and makes a functional improvement to file handling. We'll start with Capture NX-D, since that's the bigger of the two updates. In full, the list of changes made in Nikon Capture NX-D version 1.0.3 is as...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

Sony RX100 III vs Canon G7X vs Panasonic LX100: Which is the best compact camera for enthusiasts?

Imaging Resource - Di, 21/10/2014 - 20:34
    For the last couple of years, Sony has dominated the enthusiast compact camera market with its RX100-series, three closely-related, zoom-equipped cameras that are both pocket-friendly and feature much larger sensors than previous enthusiast compacts. Their nearest competitors have been Canon's G1X-series cameras, which are much larger, intended for the coat pocket rather than the pants pocket. But last month, the biennial Photokina tradeshow changed all that, as two brand-new contenders appeared, ready to vie for the title of best...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

Canon PowerShot G7 X First Impressions updated

Digital Photography Review - Di, 21/10/2014 - 16:05

From the outside, Canon's PowerShot G7 X enthusiast compact looks like the S-series models that came before it, but inside it's an entirely different story. The G7 X offers a 20MP 1"-type BSI CMOS sensor, a 24-100mm equiv. F1.8-2.8 lens and built-in Wi-Fi with NFC. We've made a substantial update to our First Impressions Review of the G7 X including a writeup of our shooting experience and performance tests. Read more

Kategorien: Fotografie

Apple iPhone 6 Plus camera review

Digital Photography Review - Di, 21/10/2014 - 15:56

The iPhone 6 Plus, introduced alongside the iPhone 6, offers one distinct feature that its sibling doesn't - optical image stabilization. In all other respects, their 8MP cameras, F2.2 aperture lenses and updated AF systems are the same. On paper the 6 Plus doesn't represent a great leap forward in terms of camera tech, but how does it perform in the real world? Read more

Kategorien: Fotografie

Red Giant Offload makes backups you can trust—even in the field

Imaging Resource - Di, 21/10/2014 - 15:48
    Do you get a little sweaty-palmed when offloading your videos, especially if you're in the field? Sure, you can make multiple copies, but there's no guarantee that something hasn't gotten corrupted along the way. Manually verifying the sanctity of each video is unnecessarily time-consuming, though, and all too easily forgotten. Thankfully, the folks at Red Giant have come to your rescue with a new app that's designed to give you peace of mind and a smoother workflow. Red Giant Offload is relatively straightforward, and...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

Lomography adds Lomochrome Turquoise film to lineup

Digital Photography Review - Di, 21/10/2014 - 15:00

Back in January 2013, Lomography announced that it would be releasing a color negative film called Lomochrome Purple, which was based on Kodak's Aerochrome. With that film, photographers could capture images with shifted colors skewed towards the presence of purple. Today the company has made a follow-up announcement, introducing the Lomochrome Turquoise XR 100-400. Read more

Kategorien: Fotografie

Axiomatic CSS and Lobotomized Owls

A List Apart - Di, 21/10/2014 - 15:00

At CSS Day last June I introduced, with some trepidation, a peculiar three-character CSS selector. Called the “lobotomized owl selector” for its resemblance to an owl’s vacant stare, it proved to be the most popular section of my talk.

I couldn’t tell you whether the attendees were applauding the thinking behind the invention or were, instead, nervously laughing at my audacity for including such an odd and seemingly useless construct. Perhaps I was unwittingly speaking to a room full of paid-up owl sanctuary supporters. I don’t know.

The lobotomized owl selector looks like this:

* + *

Despite its irreverent name and precarious form, the lobotomized owl selector is no mere thought experiment for me. It is the result of ongoing experimentation into automating the layout of flow content. The owl selector is an “axiomatic” selector with a voracious purview. As such, many will be hesitant to use it, and it will terrify some that I include it in production code. I aim to demonstrate how the selector can reduce bloat, speed up development, and help automate the styling of arbitrary, dynamic content.

Styling by prescription

Almost universally, professional web interface designers (engineers, whatever) have accustomed themselves to styling HTML elements prescriptively. We conceive of an interface object, then author styles for the object that are inscribed manually in the markup as “hooks.”

Despite only pertaining to presentation, not semantic interoperability, the class selector is what we reach for most often. While elements and most attributes are predetermined and standardized, classes are the placeholders that gift us with the freedom of authorship. Classes give us control.

.my-module { /* ... */ }

CSS frameworks are essentially libraries of non-standard class-based ciphers, intended for forming explicit relationships between styles and their elements. They are vaunted for their ability to help designers produce attractive interfaces quickly, and criticized for the inevitable accessibility shortcomings that result from leading with style (form) rather than content (function).

< !-- An unfocusable, semantically inaccurate "button" --> <a class="ui-button">press me</a>

Whether you use a framework or your own methodology, the prescriptive styling mode also prohibits non-technical content editors. It requires not just knowledge of presentational markup, but also access to that markup to encode the prescribed styles. WYSIWYG editors and tools like Markdown necessarily lack this complexity so that styling does not impede the editorial process.

Bloat

Regardless of whether you can create and maintain presentational markup, the question of whether you should remains. Adding presentational ciphers to your previously terse markup necessarily engorges it, but what’s the tradeoff? Does this allow us to reduce bloat in the stylesheet?

By choosing to style entirely in terms of named elements, we make the mistake of asserting that HTML elements exist in a vacuum, not subject to inheritance or commonality. By treating the element as “this thing that needs to be styled,” we are liable to redundantly set some values for the element in hand that should have already been defined higher in the cascade. Adding new modules to a project invites bloat, which is a hard thing to keep in check.

.module-new { /* So… what’s actually new here? */ }

From pre-processors with their addition of variables to object-based CSS methodologies and their application of reusable class “objects,” we are grappling with sandbags to stem this tide of bloat. It is our industry’s obsession. However, few remedies actually eschew the prescriptive philosophy that invites bloat in the first place. Some interpretations of object-oriented CSS even insist on a flattened hierarchy of styles, citing specificity as a problem to be overcome—effectively reducing CSS to SS and denying one of its key features.

I am not writing to condemn these approaches and technologies outright, but there are other methods that just may be more effective for certain conditions. Hold onto your hats.

Selector performance

I’m happy to concede that when some of you saw the two asterisks in * + * at the beginning of this article, you started shaking your head with vigorous disapproval. There is a precedent for that. The universal selector is indeed a powerful tool. But it can be good powerful, not just bad powerful. Before we get into that, though, I want to address the perceived performance issue.

All the studies I’ve read, including Steve Souders’ and Ben Frain’s, have concluded that the comparative performance of different CSS selector types is negligible. In fact, Frain concludes that “sweating over the selectors used in modern browsers is futile.” I’ve yet to read any compelling evidence to counter these findings.

According to Frain, it is, instead, the quantity of CSS selectors—the bloat—that may cause issues; he mentions unused declarations specifically. In other words, embracing class selectors for their “speed” is of little use when their proliferation is causing the real performance issue. Well, that and the giant JPEGs and un-subsetted web fonts.

Contrariwise, the * selector’s simultaneous control of multiple elements increases brevity, helping to reduce file size and improve performance.

The real trouble with the universal sector is that it alone doesn’t represent a very compelling axiom—nothing more intelligent than “style whatever,” anyway. The trick is in harnessing this basic selector and forming more complex expressions that are context-aware.

Dispensing with margins

The trouble with confining styles to objects is that not everything should be considered a property of an object per se. Take margins: margins are something that exist between elements. Simply giving an element a top margin makes no sense, no matter how few or how many times you do it. It’s like applying glue to one side of an object before you’ve determined whether you actually want to stick it to something or what that something might be.

.module-new { margin-bottom: 3em; /* what, all the time? */ }

What we need is an expression (a selector) that matches elements only in need of margin. That is, only elements in a contextual relationship with other sibling elements. The adjacent sibling combinator does just this: using the form x + n, we can add a top margin to any n where x has come before it.

This would, as with standard prescriptive styling, become verbose very quickly if we were to create rules for each different element pairing within the interface. Hence, we adopt the aforementioned universal selector, creating our owl face. The axiom is as follows: “All elements in the flow of the document that proceed other elements must receive a top margin of one line.”

* + * { margin-top: 1.5em; } Completeness

Assuming that your paragraphs’ font-size is 1 em and its line-height is 1.5, we just set a default margin of one line between all successive flow elements of all varieties occurring in any order. Neither we developers nor the folks building content for the project have to worry about any elements being forgotten and not adopting at least a standard margin when rendered one after the other. To achieve this the prescriptive way, we’d have to anticipate specific elements and give them individual margin values. Boring, verbose, and liable to be incomplete.

Instead of writing styles, we’ve created a style axiom: an overarching principle for the layout of flow content. It’s highly maintainable, too; if you change the line-height, just change this singular margin-top value to match.

Contextual awareness

It’s better than that, though. By applying margin between elements only, we don’t generate any redundant margin (exposed glue) destined to combine with the padding of parent elements. Compare solution (a), which adds a top margin to all elements, with solution (b), which uses the owl selector.

The diagrams in the left column show margin in dark grey and padding in light gray.

Now consider how this behaves in regard to nesting. As illustrated, using the owl selector and just a margin-top value, no first or last element of a set will ever present redundant margin. Whenever you create a subset of these elements, by wrapping them in a nested parent, the same rules that apply to the superset will apply to the subset. No margin, regardless of nesting level, will ever meet padding. With a sort of algorithmic elegance, we protect against compound whitespace throughout our interface.

This is eminently less verbose and more robust than approaching the problem unaxiomatically and removing the leftover glue after the fact, as Chris Coyier reluctantly proposed in “Spacing The Bottom of Modules”. It was this article, I should point out, that helped give me the idea for the lobotomized owl.

.module > *:last-child, .module > *:last-child > *:last-child, .module > *:last-child > *:last-child > *:last-child { margin: 0; }

Note that this only works having defined a “module” context (a big ask of a content editor), and requires estimating possible nesting levels. Here, it supports up to three.

Exception-driven design

So far, we’ve not named a single element. We’ve simply written a rule. Now we can take advantage of the owl selector’s low specificity and start judiciously building in exceptions, taking advantage of the cascade rather than condemning it as other methods do.

Book-like, justified paragraphs p { text-align: justify; } p + p { margin-top: 0; text-indent: 2em; }

Note that only successive paragraphs are indented, which is conventional—another win for the adjacent sibling combinator.

Compact modules .compact * + * { margin-top: 0.75em; }

You can employ a little class-based object orientation if you like, to create a reusable style for more compact modules. In this example, all elements that need margin receive a margin of only half a line.

Widgets with positioning .margins-off > * { margin-top: 0; }

The owl selector is an expressive selector and will affect widgets like maps, where everything is positioned exactly. This is a simple off switch. Increasingly, widgets like these will occur as web components where our margin algorithm will not be inherited anyway. This is thanks to the style encapsulation feature of Shadow DOM.

The beauty of ems

Although a few exceptions are inevitable, by harnessing the em unit in our margin value, margins already adjust automatically according to another property: font-size. In any instances that we adjust font-size, the margin will adapt to it: one-line spaces remain one-line spaces. This is especially helpful when setting an increased or reduced body font-size via a @media query.

When it comes to headings, there’s still more good fortune. Having set heading font sizes in your stylesheet in ems, appropriate margin (leading whitespace) for each heading has been set without you writing a single line of additional code.

Phrasing elements

This style declaration is intended to be inherited. That is how it, and CSS in general, is designed to work. However, I appreciate that some will be uncomfortable with just how voracious this selector is, especially after they have become accustomed to avoiding inheritance wherever possible.

I have already covered the few exceptions you may wish to employ, but, if it helps further, remember that phrasing elements with a typical display value of inline will inherit the top margin but be unaffected in terms of layout. Inline elements only respect horizontal margin, which is as specified and standard behavior across all browsers.

If you find yourself overriding the owl selector frequently, there may be deeper systemic issues with the design. The owl selector deals with flow content, and flow content should make up the majority of your content. I don’t advise depending heavily on positioned content in most interfaces because they break implicit flow relationships. Even grid systems, with their floated columns, should require no more than a simple .row > * selector applying margin-top: 0 to reset them.

Conclusion

I am a very poor mathematician, but I have a great fondness for Euclid’s postulates: a set of irreducible rules, or axioms, that form the basis for complex and beautiful geometries. Thanks to Euclid, I understand that even the most complex systems must depend on foundational rules, and CSS is no different. Although modularization of a complex interface is a necessary step in its maturation, any interface that does not follow basic governing tenets is going to lack clarity.

The owl selector allows you to control flow content, but it is also a way of relinquishing control. By styling elements according to context and circumstance, we accept that the structure of content is—and should be—mutable. Instead of prescribing the appearance of individual items, we build systems to anticipate them. Instead of prescribing the appearance of the interface as a whole, we let the content determine it. We give control back to the people who would make it.

When turning off CSS for a webpage altogether, you should notice two things. First, the page is unfalteringly flexible: the content fits the viewport regardless of its dimensions. Second—provided you have written standard, accessible markup—you should see that the content is already styled in a way that is, if not highly attractive, then reasonably traversable. The browser’s user agent styles take care of that, too.

Our endeavors to reclaim and enhance the innate device independence offered by user agents are ongoing. It’s time we worked on reinstating content independence as well.

Kategorien: Webdesign