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Adobe Stock updates: Upload directly from Photoshop Mix on iOS and new auto-categorization tool

Imaging Resource - vor 11 Stunden 15 Minuten
Adobe has continually improved the usability of Adobe Stock for its many contributors and they have announced further improvements to its workflow. The team has updated Adobe Photoshop Mix for iOS to allow photographers to upload images directly to Adobe Stock’s Contributor Portal. Further, the Contributor Portal has been improved with a brand-new auto-categorization tool which will further automate the submission process. Similar to the auto-keyword functionality previously added to the portal, the new auto-categorization tool...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

Celebrate International Dark Sky Week with a night sky time-lapse

Digital Photography Review - vor 11 Stunden 15 Minuten

A few months ago we featured the work of astrophotographer Matt Dieterich, whose iconic photo of star trails over Mt. Rainier was selected for a special series of U.S. postage stamps commemorating the 100th anniversary of the U.S. National Park Service. If you haven't seen those photos, you should definitely check them out.

In honor of International Dark Sky Week, Dieterich has just released a time-lapse video called Pacific Northwest Nights, using photos shot while working at Mt. Rainier National Park. Of course, we love it because it highlights places in our own backyard, but even if you've never been to our part of the world it's a beautiful video, and a reminder of why dark skies matter.

If you pay close attention at 0:50 and 2:45 you can even see the glow of headlamps as climbers ascend Mt. Rainier. You can find more of Dieterich's work at his website and on Instagram.

Kategorien: Fotografie

Firmware Friday: Canon 7D II, Nikon J5, Panasonic GH5, Sigma sd and dp Quattro cameras updated

Imaging Resource - vor 21 Stunden 59 Minuten
Firmware Friday is here once again, and this week brings news of updates for eight cameras from four manufacturers. This time around, it's Sigma delivering by far the majority of the new firmware, with Canon, Nikon and Panasonic each offering up one update apiece. Without any further ado, let's get right down to what's new! Canon 7D Mark II Firmware version 1.1.1 for the Canon 7D Mark II arrived yesterday, and brought with it four bug fixes as follows: Enhances reliability of communications when transferring images...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

Is the photo community OK with Sal Cincotta winning his own pay-to-enter photography contest?

Imaging Resource - vor 22 Stunden 52 Minuten
Shutterfest is a recurring photography conference that has, as a key part, an image competition. The Shutterfest photo contest asks photographers in the wedding, portrait, landscape and creative fields to put up their best work to be judged by a host of notable names in the industry (there are some very well-known photographers on this list of judges). Each photo submitted, up to 25 entries, costs $25 (or $35 for late submissions), and the winners were recently posted. Normally winners of a private photo competition aren't big...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

EXIF.co uses smart watermarks and more to protect photographers' images

Digital Photography Review - Fr, 28/04/2017 - 20:07

EXIF.co is a new service offering photographers paid photo hosting that automatically applies smart watermarks and other protections to images uploaded to the platform. It aims to allow photographers freedom to embed and share their images on the web while limiting the risk of someone re-using their work without attribution – or flat-out stealing it.

EXIF.co enables customers to share their photos using an embed feature or to share it with others directly via a sharing tool. Anyone who tries to download the photo will be blocked, presented with copyright information, and/or a watermark will be automatically applied to the saved photo, depending on the photographer's preferences.

Users can opt to apply 'smart watermarks' that appear when someone tries to download or screenshot an image, add photo credits, block embeds on websites, enable sharing with websites and track the number of online views each photo receives. The service appears simple to use, requiring customers to first upload their images, then add details to them such as credits. The user sets the permissions they want for each image, then saves it to their account.

You can see it in action below:

 

The service is free to sign up for, and it is priced on a per-thousand views basis. The rate for 10,000 to 99k views is $0.30 per 1,000 views, the 100k to 499k rate is $0.25 per 1,000 views, the 500K to 999K is $0.20 and the 1m or greater rate is $0.15. For example, EXIF.co says 10,000 views of a photograph will cost the subscriber $3. Individuals who sign up for the beta service will receive 1,000 credits for free.

The company acknowledged in a blog post yesterday that it's service certainly isn't foolproof. It stresses that its goal is to 'add some friction' to protect against casual theft. Would you find a service like this valuable? Let us know in the comments.

Via: PetaPixel

Kategorien: Fotografie

Nikon in legal tussle with ASML and Carl Zeiss over alleged patent infringements

Digital Photography Review - Fr, 28/04/2017 - 19:18

On Monday this week Nikon initiated legal action against the Dutch company ASML Holding NV, which is one of the market leaders in the field of semiconductor lithography machines. Germany's Carl Zeiss AG is ASML's optical supplier. Nikon said both companies were using its lithography technology without permission and that it was seeking damages and to prevent ASML and Zeiss from selling the technology.

Nikon and ASML have contested IP rights for more than fifteen years, as ASML has come to dominate several aspects of the market for semiconductor manufacturing equipment previously divided up primarily between Nikon and Canon.

In first statements both companies called Nikon's legal action unfounded and categorically denied any infringements. A spokesperson for ASML said the company had repeatedly attempted to negotiate an extension of a cross-license agreement with Nikon.

Now ASML and Carl Zeiss have teamed up to counter-sue Nikon and are both filing legal claims against Nikon for the infringement of more than 10 patents. Peter Wennink, ASML President and Chief Executive Officer, said the following in the company's issued statement:

We have no choice but to file these countersuits. We have tried for many years to come to a cross-license agreement that reflects the increased strength of our patent portfolio. Unfortunately, Nikon has never seriously participated in negotiations. Now that Nikon has decided to take this dispute to court, we also have to enforce our patent portfolio, and we will do this as broadly as possible.

Both ASML and Carl Zeiss have issued press releases on the matter. It seems this is a legal dispute that could go on for quite some time, and not the first one involving these three parties either. According to Nikon, ASML and Carl Zeiss paid it $87 million and $58 million respectively in 2004. We'll keep you updated on any future developments.

Kategorien: Fotografie

Canon EOS M6 Field Test: Compact mirrorless ILC shows Canon’s continued improvements to M series

Imaging Resource - Fr, 28/04/2017 - 16:30
Click here to read our Canon EOS M6 Field Test Earlier this year, we Field Tested the Canon EOS M5 and found it to be an impressive mirrorless entry from Canon and a big improvement in numerous ways over its predecessors. Canon has expanded their mirrorless lineup with the Canon EOS M6, which shares many features with the M5 but eschews a built-in electronic viewfinder and sells for less money. We took the Canon EOS M6 out into the field to see how it handled and the results were mostly positive. The Canon M6 relies on a...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

Acer unveils 31.5" 4K display for image editors and other creative types

Digital Photography Review - Fr, 28/04/2017 - 15:36

At its Acer Next event in New York City the Taiwanese electronics manufacturer has unveiled its new 31.5" ProDesigner PE320QK display. The new monitor features super-thin bezels and, looking at the impressive specifications, is clearly targeted at image editors and other creatives. It offers 550 nits of brightness at 4K (3840 x 2160 pixels) resolution and has an enhanced color gamut, supporting 130 percent of the sRGB and 95 percent of the DCI-P3 color spaces. Response time of the display is 4 milliseconds, with a 100 million to 1 contrast ratio.

In terms of connectivity there are two HDMI 2.0 ports, audio out, a DisplayPort 1.2, a USB 3.1 type C input, and four USB 3.1 Type C outputs which are suitable for peripherals and support power delivery of up to 85W. The display also comes with a pair of 2W speakers and a removable anti-glare hood. Unfortunately Acer has not provided any information on pricing and availability yet. 

Kategorien: Fotografie

Acer unveils 31.5" 4K display for image editors and other creatives

Digital Photography Review - Fr, 28/04/2017 - 15:36

At its Acer Next event in New York City the Taiwanese electronics manufacturer has unveiled its new 31.5" ProDesigner PE320QK display. The new monitor features super-thin bezels and, looking at he impressive specifications, is clearly targeted at image editors and other creatives. It offers 550 nits of brightness at 4K (3840 x 2160 pixels) resolution and has an enhanced color gamut, supporting 130 percent of the sRGB and 95 percent of the DCI-P3 color spaces. Response time of the display is 4 milliseconds, with a 100 million to 1 contrast ratio.

In terms of connectivity there are two HDMI 2.0 ports, audio out, a DisplayPort 1.2, a USB 3.1 type C input, and four USB 3.1 Type C outputs which are suitable for peripherals and support power delivery of up to 85W. The display also comes with a pair of 2W speakers and a removable anti-glare hood. Unfortunately Acer has not provided any information on pricing and availability yet.

Kategorien: Fotografie

Canon releases firmware version 1.1.1 for EOS 7D Mark II

Digital Photography Review - Fr, 28/04/2017 - 15:09

Canon has released new firmware for the Mark II generation of its EOS 7D APS-C DSLR. Version 1.1.1 includes all the improvements and fixes of previous updates and in addition addresses the following issues:  

  1. Enhanced reliability of communications when transferring images using Wireless File Transmitter WFT-E7 (A/B/C/D/E).
  2. Corrects the phenomenon of Err70 which occurs with certain combinations of settings.
  3. Corrects the phenomenon in which in very rare cases the shutter can no longer be released.
  4. Enhances reliability of operations for specific custom function settings.

Please note that if you are using a W-E1 Wi-Fi adapter the camera nickname will be reset to default when the new firmware is installed. You should therefore change the nickname before using the camera again. Firmware version 1.1.1 is now available for download from the Canon website

Kategorien: Fotografie

Filmmaker builds a motorized camera slider for his Panasonic GH3 using LEGO toys

Imaging Resource - Fr, 28/04/2017 - 15:00
If you love photography – and I think you do if you’re reading this – and also LEGO bricks, then you will thoroughly enjoy what Dutch filmmaker Victor Bart has created. Bart built not only a camera slider track, which is just over 45 inches (115 millimeters) long, using LEGO bricks, but also the dolly and the remote. Unsurprisingly the slider track has a few bumps due to the joints between LEGO bricks, but the dolly runs quite well with its LEGO bricks and rubber tires. The controller uses LEGO Technic parts and the speed...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

Zeiss’s new CP.3 cinema lenses provide visual effects possibilities for everyone

Imaging Resource - Fr, 28/04/2017 - 11:00
Zeiss has announced 10 new cinema lenses in two different versions, the CP.3 and the CP.3 XD. It was challenging to describe exactly what makes these new Zeiss optics special in just a few short words. Basically, Zeiss has created lenses that do much more than help capture a scene. The CP.3 XD lenses use something called "ZEISS eXtended Data" which is the first metadata technology which stores the lens distortion and shading for every single frame. All /i-Technology metadata is recorded (which includes focus distance, aperture...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

NAB 2017: Hot products and trends

Digital Photography Review - Fr, 28/04/2017 - 11:00
NAB 2017

Yesterday marked the end of NAB 2017, the annual convention of the National Association of Broadcasters. NAB isn't really a consumer-oriented event, but we like to go because it gives us some insight into trends and technology that will trickle down to prosumer and consumer products within a few years, as well as new products designed for these users.

With over 100,000 people in attendance, and almost 2,000 companies exhibiting, it's a safe bet that we can't share everything from NAB with you. (And really, do you want to hear about things like the latest advances in rack-mount news van hardware?) That said, let's take a look at some of the things that did catch our eye at NAB 2017.

Atomos rocks the house

An afternoon trip to the Atomos booth is like the NAB equivalent of trying to get into a U2 concert. Things got so crazy in recent years (thanks in part to daily equipment giveaways), that for 2017 Atomos built a booth where CEO Jeromy Young could hold court and do live demos for the masses from an elevated perch. I almost expected him to start singing 'Don't cry for me, Argentina' as he leaned over the balcony.

But the masses had good reason to be excited, because Atomos showed off a couple very cool products... 

Atomos Ninja Inferno

Although it was announced about a month ago, this was the first chance many people had to get their hands on the new Ninja Inferno off-camera monitor and recorder. The Ninja Inferno is basically a non-SDI version of the company's flagship Shogun Inferno, and Atomos is specifically targeting Panasonic GH5 users with support for 4K/60p recording via HDMI-out. For $995 it seems like a pretty compelling package, and apparently the masses agreed.

We have a Ninja Inferno we've been testing with the GH5, so we'll be bringing you an in-depth look at this combination in the near future.

Atomos Sumo

While Shoguns and Ninjas drew people into the Atomos booth, what really got their attention was the new Sumo. Imagine an oversized, 19" Shogun recorder and you'll have a pretty good mental image of what it is. It can record 4K 12-bit Raw, 10-bit ProRes/NNxHR.

But the Sumo isn't just for on-set monitoring and recording. It's also designed to be an HDR color grading monitor, either in the field or in your edit suite. With a brightness of 1200 nits and a claimed 10+ stops of dynamic range, the Sumo can accept Log, PQ, or HLG signals from your editing software and display color accurate HDR footage with 10-bit quality.

This thing is a beast. If you want a sense of scale, look at the lower right hand corner of the picture above. See that little thing next to it? That's a 7" Shogun recorder. And with a price tag of $2,495, it's surprisingly affordable. I want one of these things!

Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro

Blackmagicdesign is another company on fire with useful products for emerging filmmakers and even consumers. At NAB the company showed off its recently released URSA Mini Pro 4.6K camera. It offers a user-swappable lens mount, with support for EF, PL, and B4 mounts, and the company promises a Nikon mount later this year. Its Super 35 sensor captures 15 stops of dynamic range, and the camera includes built-in ND filters for optimal exposure. 

the URSA Mini Pro feels like a very solid piece of equipment, and with a price tag of $5,995 it offers a lot of bang for the buck.

DaVinci Resolve: More features, lower price

Blackmagic also announced upgrades to its industry standard DaVinci Resolve software.

Branded as DaVinci Resolve 14, the new version promises to revolutionize the Resolve experience. In addition to a fully integrated NLE and industry leading color grading tools, Resolve 14 now includes pro-level audio tools, the result of a 2016 acquisition of Fairlight, a manufacturer of audio hardware and software for motion picture production. The addition of Fairlight audio tools means that users have access to professional editing, color correction, and audio tools in a single piece of software. Blackmagic claims that Resolve 14 also improves playback performance by a factor of 10.

What's possibly just as interesting as the new features is the new price. While the basic version of Resolve will remain free, the full DaVinci Resolve Studio 14 will cost $299, a significant decrease from the previous price of $995. This is a shot across the bow of Premiere Pro and Final Cut Pro X, and should attract a lot more new users to the system. A beta of Resolve 14 is available now.

Blackmagic Mini and Micro Panels

One of the important features of the DaVinci Resolve experience has been integration with the DaVinci Resolve Advanced Panel, a $30,000 piece of hardware used by professional colorists, but out of reach to users with smaller budgets.

A few weeks ago, Blackmagic introduced two smaller panels, the Resolve Mini Panel ($2,995) and the Resolve Micro panel ($995). These smaller panels would be useful for a pro to use in the field, or in a smaller home studio, however they also represent a very affordable way for smaller production companies, or even enthusiasts, to access pro-level editing equipment at an affordable cost. I found both panels to be very easy to use: the trackballs and dials are very smooth and well-weighted, and the panels actually feel a lot more solid than they appear in pictures (at least to me). I think this is a great addition to the Resolve family of products, and I hope to do an extended test at some point.

Blackmagic Web Presenter

I know, I've covered a lot of Blackmagic products already, but I'm going to throw in one more. The Blackmagic Web Presenter is a box that does one basic thing, but does it really well. It takes output from any camera via HDMI or SDI, and converts the signal to a high quality 720p stream that gets sent to a computer through USB so that it appears as a standard webcam.

What that means is that you an use virtually any camera as a high quality webcam for applications like Skype, YouTube Live, or anything else that uses a webcam as a video source. So, if you're tired of using your cheap built-in camera or mobile phone for your guest appearances on CNN, plug your GH5, 5D IV, or E-M1 II into the Web Presenter and Anderson Cooper will have no idea you're coming to him live from your living room.

DJI meets Hasselblad: 100MP aerial photos ensue

Remember that time when DJI took an ownership stake in Hasselblad? Remember how we all joked that DJI would put a medium format camera on a drone? We all got some good laughs out of that, didn't we?

Well, they went and did it, pairing a DJI M600 Pro hexacopter and a Hasselblad H6D-100c 100MP camera mounted on a Ronin-MX gimbal. Pricing hasn't been announced, but the good news is that you can get the M600 Pro for only $5,000. Of course, you'll still need a $30,000 H6D-100c to complete the package. (Though I hear free shipping is common...)

Curiously, there were a couple Hasselblad X1Ds sitting next to the drone as well, a camera whose size and weight might be more amenable to flight. I asked a Hasselblad representative if there were plans to release a similar combination using the X1D instead, but he wouldn't confirm if that were the case. Of course, he didn't deny it either.

Virtual Reality

Virtual reality, or VR, has been trying to get traction in the market for several years. Although it has gained some success in the gaming community, adoption of VR technology for photos and video has been slower. However, that certainly isn't keeping people from trying to find the magic formula, and there's a lot of investment from companies trying to do just that. Let's take a look at a few VR products that grabbed our attention.

New Ricoh Theta

By now, everyone has probably heard of the Ricoh Theta. In fact, it's one of the few VR cameras that has seen fairly wide adoption, thanks to its compact size and ease of use. However, the current Theta S still suffers from relatively low 1080p video quality and a lack of spatial audio.

The new Theta prototype on display at NAB addresses both of those issues, with 4K capture, four microphones, and also live 4K streaming capability. What really stands out to me here is the directional audio. Even at 4K, your VR viewing experience is still somewhat limited by the relatively low resolution of most viewing hardware, however in a demo the spatial audio was immediately noticeable. Instead of guessing where sound is coming from and trying to correlate it with what's in front of your eyes, directional sound allows you to tell where the sound is coming from, providing a more immersive experience. No word on when the next Theta will be released.

Ricoh R Development Kit

We first saw the Ricoh R development kit at CES, but it was on full working display at NAB. The Ricoh R is based on the same overall design as the Theta, but has a very different purpose: it's designed to provide 24-hour 360º live streaming. As such, there are a few differences in the product.

The most obvious one is a ribbed surface on the camera, which we're guessing is to assist with heat dissipation. Also, unlike the upcoming version of the Theta, the Ricoh R still uses 1080p resolution, which should reduce data usage while streaming 24/7. Additionally, all image stitching is done in-camera, which makes it easy to feed out VR video for streaming. There's no internal battery either, which probably makes sense for a device designed to run 24 hours a day.

What will the Ricoh R be used for? Well, pretty much anything you want, ranging from a security camera to placing it in the middle of a falcon's nest. Ricoh wants you to develop unique applications. It will be available in June, and you can pre-order it now for $499.

YI Halo VR camera

YI Technology arrived in town with the new YI Halo, a VR camera built around Google's Jump platform. The Halo utilizes 17 synchronized 4K YI cameras to record 8K stereoscopic video. At first glance, it appears that the cameras in the Halo are just standard YI 4K action cameras, but that's not the case. While similar in size and shape, YI has actually made special cameras optimized for easy swapping and improved heat management.

After watching some sample videos from the Halo I have to admit I was pretty impressed. It's some of the better VR footage I've seen. What particularly stood out were outdoor scenes with bright clouds. Clouds tend to be blown out on most VR cameras due to limited dynamic range, but on the Halo footage you could still see quite a bit of detail without darker areas on the ground being crushed to black. 

The Halo is expected to be available this summer for a cool price of $17,000.

Insta360 Pro

The new Insta360 Pro is an impressive VR camera that captures 8K video, or 6K stereoscopic video, in a small, spherical package. It emphasizes the ability to get very high quality footage straight out of camera that can be streamed or posted online quickly, for example by a reporter in the field. In addition to six fish eye lenses, the Insta360 Pro includes four integrated microphones for spatial audio, but also supports external audio and power for extended use. All stitching is done in-camera, making it easy to stream out content live during an event.

Video quality was surprisingly good, though I still noticed obvious stitching artifacts in places. Also, whenever I looked at the camera, I couldn't get over the feeling that it was smiling and staring back at me. Kind of like an evil clown. But if you can get past that, it's possible to order one now for $3,500, with units expected to ship in mid-May.

The VR camera we all want

Of course, if you really want to do VR right, you build a spherical rig for 10 Arri Alexas. It's the perfect solution if you have ten Alexas sitting around. 

Just sayin'.

Sony still makes video tapes

Yes, Sony still makes video tapes. And yes, there's still a market for them.

Fujinon MK50-135mm T2.9 cine lens

In the past year we've seen a lot of new cine lenses aimed at emerging filmmakers who want the quality of cine lenses without spending $20,000 and up for the privilege. In fact, just a couple months ago, Fujifilm announced its new MK series of cine lenses aimed at this market. We tested the first of these, the Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9, and found it too be an outstanding lens, both in terms of image quality and build.

At NAB, Fujifilm displayed the second lens in the series, the MK 50-135mm T2.9 lens. It shares the same weight and dimensions as the 18-55mm lens, as well as its parfocal design and E-mount for use on Sony cameras. The lens is expected to be available in July, and while pricing has not been announced, we expect it to be in the same ballpark as the 18-55mm model, or around $3,799.

Fujifilm MK lenses in X-mount

When Fujifilm announced the MK series of Fujinon lenses, there was initially some confusion about the fact that Fujifilm was releasing them for Sony E-mount. This actually made a lot of sense, considering how many Sony Super 35 cameras are in use professionally. However, the company made clear it would eventually release the MK lenses in Fujifilm's own X-mount as well.

At NAB, we got our first look at one of these X-mount lenses, the MK18-55mm T2.9, attached to a Fujifilm X-T2 body. Pricing and release date remain unannounced, but earlier this year Fujifilm told us the X-mount versions would be available 'near the end' of 2017.

Zeiss CP.2 Primes get artsy

Zeiss says that its Compact Prime CP.2 series of lenses are the most popular cine lenses it has ever produced. To commemorate this success, the company was busy creating a series of 'art' lenses (pardon me if that sounds a bit familiar...) by artist Joseph Ari Aloi. In fact, Aloi was in the Zeiss booth painting lenses in all shapes, colors and patterns.

C'mon. You know you want it.

Sigma Cine lenses

Not to be left out of the cine lens game, Sigma was showing off the newest members of its Cine Prime line of lenses, the Cine FF High Speed 14mm T2 and the  Cine FF High Speed 135mm T2, which join five existing prime lenses in Sigma's Cine Prime product line.

The Sigma Cine Primes are based on existing Sigma lens designs, but are redesigned into cinema-friendly hardware, including high quality mechanical barrels with integrated gearing. In use, the new lenses feel very solid and should produce beautiful video. If you don't like seeing your distances in feet, you can opt for a metric version. The lens markings even glow in the dark for low light use.

Illuminati light and color meter

The Illuminati light and color meter, from Illuminati Instruments Corporation, is a clever little device that provides all the functionality of a traditional meter, but uses Bluetooth communication and a mobile phone (or smartwatch) app as a user interface. This means it's much smaller than traditional meters that have displays and controls integrated into a single unit.

What's even more helpful is that a phone can be paired with multiple meters, meaning they can be placed around a scene and accessed from a single app. The meter can continuously monitor both ambient exposure and color, and warn a photographer if any changes in brightness or color temperature occur. What's more, additional software functionality can be added in the future through a simple app update.

The Illuminati light meter is available for pre-order through a Kickstarter campaign with about three weeks remaining. This is an impressive little device, so I'm rooting for them.

Manfrotto Nitrotech tripod head

Manrotto's new Nitrotech N8 tripod head uses an innovative design to provide good balance and smooth motion with a minimum of fuss. Where the horizontal axis of the head would usually be, the Nitrotech head uses what Manfrotto calls a 'nitrogen piston mechanism' to push up against the bottom of the mounting surface. It claims this will counteract movement of the head and the pull of gravity to product fluid and controlled motions.

I was impressed at how well the Nitrotech head worked. With a large camera and lens mounted on it, it did an excellent job of maintaining balance no matter where I placed the center of gravity of the camera. Even with the weight moved forward on the tripod, the Nitrotech head stopped moving wherever I left it, with no downward creep. It also produced relatively smooth motion when panning and tilting, though it wasn't as smooth as a very high quality fluid head. I suspect it would work nicely for still photography as well, particularly when using long telephoto lenses.

Sennheiser MKE 2 Elements mic for GoPro Hero 4

One of the downsides of using action cameras in waterproof cases is that audio can be truly horrible, with muffled sounds and rattles transmitted from equipment like bikes or snowboards.To solve this problem, Sennheiser designed the MKE 2 elements microphone for the GoPro Hero 4. As its name implies, the elements mic is built around Sennheiser's very well-regarded MKE 2 lavalier microphone, but in a design created to be tough and withstand the elements, be it snow, water, or dust. The flexible stem of the mic also isolates it from vibrations for a rattle-free recording.

After watching and listening to several videos show with the MKE 2 elements mic, I have to say that it seems like the real deal. Sound was noticeably better than I'm used to hearing through waterproof cases on action cams, and was very clear and realistic. The sound of water was particularly impressive, and added to the immersive sense of being right there in the waves with a surfer. Sennheiser even had a unit sitting in a tank of water to illustrate how elements-proof it actually is.

HDR video

For the last decade, improvements in video generally had to do with resolution, resolution, 3D (oops, not so much), and more resolution. Over the past couple years, however, there has been increased focus on dynamic range, and it seemed like everyone at NAB this year was talking about HDR video, which promises brighter brights, blacker blacks, and more realistic renditions of real world scenes.

HDR video will also impact photographers as the technology finds its way into computer monitors and all kinds of display devices used for photos. We're planning to take an in-depth look at this topic in a stand alone article in order to give you some insight into the state of the industry, and why it could have a big impact on the way we work with photos. Stay tuned.

8K/120p

OK, you knew we'd get to it eventually. 8K video has been a hot topic at NAB for the past couple years, and of course that continued in 2017 as well. 8K holds great potential for content creators, but it's clear the industry is pushing hard to move 8K into the living room as well. 

I'm not convinced that consumers are quite ready to begin moving to 8K TVs yet, especially since most of them haven't even gone 4K. However, the one 8K demo that absolutely blew my mind was watching a hockey game in 8K/120p. If you think 60p looks lifelike, 120p is even more so. And at 8K resolution it's borderline amazing. In fact, if broadcasters can figure out how to deliver 8K/120p, it may be the thing that does convince people they need to upgrade once again, particularly if they're sports fans.

Kategorien: Fotografie

2017 Roundups: Fixed Prime Lens Cameras

Digital Photography Review - Fr, 28/04/2017 - 09:07

The fixed lens camera market may be a bit niche, but it's here that you'll find some of the best cameras you can buy. Sensors ranging from APS-C to full-frame are designed to match their lenses, which cover ranges from 28-75mm equiv., so image quality is top-notch.

This segment includes both pocketable models without viewfinders to 'best worn over your shoulder' cameras with unique or ultra-high-resolution EVFs. There's a gigantic spread in pricing, as well. The Fujifilm X70 and Ricoh GR II can be had for under $700, while the Leica Q sells for around $4250.

For those who want to 'zoom with their feet,*' here are the fixed-lens cameras we think are worth a look:

*Obviously it isn't the same as actually zooming.

Kategorien: Fotografie

Aurora Aperture launches 16-stop ND filter and rear filters for Canon’s super-wide lenses

Digital Photography Review - Do, 27/04/2017 - 19:50

US filter brand Aurora Aperture has announced a neutral density filter that it claims reduces exposure by 16 stops. The company has launched a new family of fixed factor ND filters called PowerND and is offering strengths of 6, 12 and 16 stops in screw-in and square formats.

The ND64, ND4000 and ND65000 filters will be available for threads of 37-95mm as well as a special 105mm version that will fit an adapter for the Nikkor AF-S 14-24mm F2.8G ED wide-angle zoom. Those preferring a filter system will be able to use the 100 x 100mm square filters. The 16-stop filter is designed for those wanting to make long exposures in daylight conditions and can knock a 1/1000sec shutter speed situation down to 1 minute.

Aurora Aperture has also introduces a series called Aurora CR with filters designed to fit over the rear mount of Canon super-wide lenses. The arch-window-shaped Gorilla Glass filters slide into a holder that screws on to the rear of the lens, and while aimed at users of the Canon EF 11-24mm F4 L USM the system will work with a range of the company’s wide-angle zoom lenses.

The filters are available via Kickstarter with delivery and general sales due to begin in August. Prices start from $34 for small screw-in filters of any of the strengths, to $117 for the 150mm circular filter. The CR kit including the holder and three filters is $165. For more information see the Aurora Aperture website and the company’s Kickstarter page.

Press release

Aurora Aperture Introduces PowerND Family and an Industry First Rear Mount Glass Filter for Canon EF 11-24mm F4L USM

Aurora Aperture Inc., a Southern California startup, today has introduced the PowerND family of high quality fixed neutral density (ND) filters.

The PowerND family consists of three ratings of light reduction capability: ND64 (6 stops),ND4000 (12 stops), and ND65000 (16 stops). Four different formats are available: circular filters from 37mm to 95mm, 100 x 100mm square filters compatible with popular square filter adapters, 150mm circular filters with an adapter for the Nikon AF-S 14-24mm f/2.8G ED lens, and the Aurora CR format, an industry first, a rear mount glass filter for the Canon EF 11-24mm F4L USM lens.

The 6 stop filter is typically used in low light conditions such as during sunrise or sunset for sub-second shutter speed. The 12 stop filter can slow down shutter speed to minutes in dusk and dawn conditions. The 16 stop filter can do magic on a bright day, allowing photographers to expose up to several minutes or more.

The ND4000 and ND65000 have distinct advantages in having more stops than the typical ND1000 or ND32000. They allow users to avoid diffraction softening by enabling users to avoid very small aperture settings or alternatively allowing for longer exposures. In the case of the PowerND 4000 that means two more stops than the typical ND1000 and for the Power ND65000 there’s one additional stop.

“We introduced a variable ND family last year and it was embraced by photographers and videographers worldwide,” said Jinfu Chen, founder and CEO of Aurora Aperture Inc. “the fixed ND family we introduce today is much more powerful in terms of light reduction capability and offers even better optical performance, along with more formats for different camera lenses.”

A small rear mount filter using Gorilla® Glass for the Canon EF 11-24mm F4L USM is an industry first. Prior to this users would have to use extremely large filters with diameters up to 186mm with a bulky front lens shade adapter. The Aurora CR format filter mounts in the rear of the lens, making it much easier to carry and lower in cost. Other Canon lenses that Aurora CR format filter can be used in* are the EF 8-15mm f/4L Fisheye, EF 11-24mm F4L USM, EF 14mm f/2.8L US, EF 15mm f/2.8 Fisheye, EF 16-35mm f/2.8L USM, and EF 17-40mm f/4L USM.

Designed in California by Aurora Aperture, the Aurora PowerND filters employ up to 128 layers of double sided nano coating** in order to achieve color accuracy and powerful light reduction capability. Hydrophobic and oleophobic coating is applied to filter surface with PFPE coating. The end result is that water droplet on the filter surface can maintain a static contact angle of 110 degrees, one of the best in the industry.

Availability and Pricing
The Aurora PowerND family will be available through Kickstarter starting in April 2017 and to dealers and direct orders in August 2017. List price starts at US$42 and varies depending on filter format and size.
http://www.aurora-aperture.com
info@aurora-aperture.com
* As of April 21, 2017
** ND4000 and ND65000

Kategorien: Fotografie

Harbortronics' DigiSnap Pro is designed for long-term time-lapse photography

Digital Photography Review - Do, 27/04/2017 - 19:39

Harbortronics has announced DigiSnap Pro, its new low-power complete system controller for long-term time-lapse photography. The controller supports both networked and autonomous operation and can be used with the company's Cyclapse Pro, a time-lapse photography system that includes a camera housing and solar panel for use in locations where AC power is unavailable. 

According to Harbortronics, the DigiSnap Pro controller can be used with 'practically any modern high quality digital camera,' which is said to include medium format models, mirrorless, and full-frame SLRs. When used with the Cyclapse Classic systems, the company says DigiSnap Pro replaces both the Cyclapse Power Module and the DigiSnap 2700, and that all the cables support the DigiSnap Pro. The new controller can be remotely configured using the company's Android app and Bluetooth LE, and a network remote configuration option is being developed. 

DigiSnap Pro itself offers all the functions one would typically need for long-term time-lapse photography, according to the company, including power management, automated image transfer and local data storage, and monitoring the system for issues. Status emails are sent when a problem is detected, including issues with the housing door, camera failure, low battery, temperature issues, and more.

Kategorien: Fotografie

Are you Nat Geo’s next Travel Photographer of the Year? Enter to win $2,500 and a trip to the Galápagos

Imaging Resource - Do, 27/04/2017 - 19:00
Entries are now open for National Geographic’s popular Travel Photographer of the Year photo contest. Entries are accepted until June 30 at 12:00 PM EDT and photographers can win up to US$2,500 in cash and a ten-day trip for two to the Galápagos with National Geographic Expeditions. In total, there is $3,750 in cash prizes up for grabs, with $750 and $500 going to second and third place winners respectively. All three winners will receive a year’s subscription to National Geographic Traveler as well, a publication in which all...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

Lomography Ten and One Annual Photo Awards announces winners from over 100,000 entries

Imaging Resource - Do, 27/04/2017 - 17:00
The Ten and One Annual Lomography Photo Awards was started in 2016 and aims to push the boundaries of photography and inspire photographers to break out of their comfort zones and challenge the medium itself. The awards include 11 different categories, ten of which are unchanging with an additional special theme which changes to reflect contemporary global issues - which was centered on migration and identity in this edition of the competition. After 114,931 entries from 76 countries, 28 judges narrowed the entries down to 110...
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Kategorien: Fotografie

Serious speed: Sony a9 real world samples gallery

Digital Photography Review - Do, 27/04/2017 - 16:00

The Sony a9 made headlines shortly after its announcement due in no small part to its laundry list of impressive specifications. With 20fps burst shooting, 693 autofocus points and a 3.7m dot electronic OLED viewfinder with no blackout at all in continuous shooting, this camera's got some serious specs and Sony has made some serious claims about its performance.

During our time in New York for the announcement, we were able to learn the ins-and-outs of the camera while photographing hockey players, figure skaters, and a full-on track meet to see just how the camera fared - and it fared well. But don't take our word for it, check it out for yourself in our real world samples gallery. The AF system combined with 20 fps allowed us to nail the exact moment, while the excellent JPEG engine retained detail and minimized noise even at ISOs in the thousands.

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See the Sony a9 real world samples gallery

Burst shooting samples

If you're curious about what a 20fps burst actually looks like, and how well the camera tracks during them, check out this video showing three of those bursts.

Updated first impressions

We've also been hard at work digging into the Sony a9 as much as we could, given our limited time with it and lack of Raw support. Our shooting experience has been updated with impressions of both JPEG image quality and autofocus performance.

DPR's updated impressions of the Sony a9

Kategorien: Fotografie

Updated: A closer look at Sony a9 image quality and autofocus

Digital Photography Review - Do, 27/04/2017 - 16:00

While combing through our thousands of images from Sony's a9 launch event last week, we've taken a critical look at the camera's revamped JPEG engine and the effectiveness of its 653-point autofocus system. Read more

Kategorien: Fotografie